"Linguistics" Blogs & Blog Posts

The Brazuca BlogThe Brazuca Blog

A blog about Brazil, the Lusophone world and Portuguese language.

 
Separated by a Common LanguageSeparated by a Common Language

Observations on British and American English by an American linguist living...

 
Memoirs of a LinguistMemoirs of a Linguist

This blog is about the daily activities of a 28-year-old Ph.D. candidate, w...

 


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Latest Blog Posts



Lawyers have their legalese. Academics have their own intra-academialogical post-linguistic theories. And it was only before the MBAs joined the fray with their own self-important syntax. If you've ever been in the sleek office setting of a start-up...

One of the most controversial hypotheses for the origin of human language faculty is the evolutionary conjecture that language arose instantaneously in humans through a single gene mutation. ` These research studies claim that it is more likely that...

Migration is not only reflected in DNA, but also in language. By tracing changes in language, we learn more about the lifestyle of the people that speak it. University lecturer Tijmen Pronk (40) conducts linguistic research into (pre)historical migra...

"Climb on me", "climb on you" and "resume play" are among the requests wild orangutans make to each other, researchers say. Credit: Tim Laman/BBCIn the first in-depth study of gestures among wild orangutans, University of Exeter scientists identifie...

How the languages of the world emerged is largely a mystery. Considering that it might have taken millennia, it is intriguing to see how deaf people can create novel sign languages spontaneously. Observations have shown that when deaf strangers are b...

From hieroglyphics to emojis, and grunts to gestures, humans have always used multiple modes to communicate, including language. Modes of communication [Credit: Wits University]If you've ever sent a text using emojis, which the recipient received an...

Visit Merriam-Webster's "Time Traveler" and select a year from the drop-down menu. Instantly you'll see the English words that were first used in print that year! More specifically, "the date is for the earliest written or printed use that the (dicti...